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Search Results for: Agnes Ballantyne

  1. The ‘Monster Petition’ and the Women of Davis Street

    …eed. Unfortunately, Agnes’s historical record is tied almost exclusively to her children; after Doris’s 1907 birth record, which shows they were still in North Carlton, the Lewis family virtually disappears until Agnes’s death in 1945 in St Kilda. The story of Agnes, incomplete as it is, is a powerful reminder of how long it took Victorian women to gain suffrage. Between the time she signed the petition and achieved the right…

  2. ‘Doing their bit helping make Australia free’: mothers of Aboriginal diggers and the assertion of Indigenous rights

    …PA. When the question arose of advising the termination of allotments, the BPA took the alternative path with Agnes, as they had eventually with Eliza Saunders. Rather than fighting the Department of Defence, the BPA reduced Agnes’s material assistance, a measure which lay within its power. Agnes acknowledged that she received some rations and clothing through the BPA, but maintained that when she left Lake Condah she understood that the full…

  3. Nichola Cooke:

    …hind the over-crowded education market in Britain and came to the colonies seeking new opportunities. 6 Poster advertising sailing of Amelia Thompson, Suffolk Record Office, M942, Papers, Earl of Stradbroke On 28 April 1836, Agnes Sargent and her four daughters boarded the Amelia Thompson at Gravesend, arriving at Launceston on 26 August that year. 7 The ship’s passenger lists describe the family as Mrs Agnes Sargent (also…

  4. Reading Insanity’s Archive:

    …, vol. 10, 1997, pp. 137-55. 18. See A McCarthy, ‘Ethnicity, migration and the mental hospital in early twentieth-century Auckland, New Zealand’, Social history of medicine, vol. 21, no. 1, 2008, pp. 47-65. 19. T Ballantyne, ‘Rereading the archive and opening up the nation state: colonial knowledge in South Asia (and beyond)’, in A Burton (ed.), After the imperial turn: thinking with and through the nation, Duke…

  5. Rescuing the Regent Theatre

    …k Thring) opened a number of ‘Regents’ in Australia and New Zealand – the first in Sydney in March 1928. The Regent in Melbourne was the third in the chain, but by far the most elaborate. Designed by Cedric Ballantyne and built by James Porter & Sons, as many of Thring’s Regent theatres were, the Melbourne Regent with its Gothic grand foyer was said to resemble a cathedral.4 The inspiration for the auditorium came…

  6. PROVguide 29: Wills and Probate Records 1841 – 2015

    …tised will and probate documents can be downloaded from PROV’s website free of charge and used for personal research. Before any records held by PROV can be reproduced, for example in a printed publication, exhibition or website, the written permission of the copyright holder must first be obtained. Please consult PROVguide 25 Copyright for Researchers for details. Example recordAn excerpt from the will of Agnes SmithPROV, VPRS 7591/P2, Unit…

  7. Round 11 Recipients – Local History Grants Program

    …Shire Hall Awarded: $2,000 As part of our centenary celebrations we are preparing various displays of historical significance to our area. This project will research and produce an interpretive display detailing the life of Agnes Buntine a famous local bullocky who made regular journeys from Port Albert through Rosedale to the gold fields with supplies. Moyston Hall Committee Moyston Hall Centenary Book Awarded: $8,000 This project will record…

  8. Campbell and Woolley’s Store

    …ntioned in the diary of Katherine Kirkland, the wife of squatter Kenneth Kirkland. Mrs Kirkland tells us that she and a large number of relatives, servants and friends landed at Point Henry in January 1839.[8] These included Agnes, the infant daughter of thirty‑year‑old Katherine. They had five drays with bullocks, and a spring cart on which were packed the family, along with four little dogs, three cats, some cocks and hens, a pair of rabbits,…

  9. Who says ‘you can’t change history’?

    …hing it.[59] While searching for Arthur’s mental asylum record, leafing through the files, a familiar name jumped out at me, and I chanced upon the record of a member of great aunt Laura’s first husband’s family, Agnes Treacy. Another amazing find! I was also able to find inquest files for the next generation of my family. In addition to my great, great uncle Arthur, his brother Alfred and his sister Lavinia Beatrice McDonald nee…

  10. John Jones: a builder of early West Melbourne

    …ourne.[28] The Tait family were the owners and occupiers of 76 Hawke Street from 1880 until 1917. Mr Tait was a foreman with the Metropolitan Gas Company for 27 years and died in August 1890.[29] He was survived by his wife, Agnes, a music teacher who continued to live at number 76 for many years.[30] Another person of interest to live in a house built by Jones was Phillip Pedretti, a World War I veteran who resided with his family at 46 Hawke…

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