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Victorian Archives Centre public opening hours

Monday to Friday: 10:00 am to 4:30 pm
(excl. public holidays)
The second and last Saturday of every month

War wounded: Mont Park Hospital for the Insane

 

Recently Australia stopped what they were doing for one minute to remember the men and women who put their lives on the line in the name of their country. At 11am on 11 November we stop to remember our diggers, our patriarchs and matriarchs who enlisted in wars for the betterment of their Australia.

During this time, inevitably news pieces crop up about the tragedies and triumphs of our diggers, the untold stories about their heroics in the line of fire. However, one story grabbed my attention in particular. When we think about soldiers returning home after the battles, when they are shipped back to the home front due to injury or the eventual cessation of the hostilities, we think about joyous rapture to be away from the brutalities of war and back in the arms and comfort of their families and loved ones. What is not so frequently written or discussed is what the brutal nature of war can do to a soldier’s mental health. Whilst today, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is recognised as a real part of the repercussions of war, at the conclusion of the First and Second World War’s common phrases such as “shell shock” were used to describe the state in which soldiers returned home. In hindsight, these cases of “shell shock” could possibly have also been cases of PTSD or further mental health issues related to the trauma and brutality of war. So it was in a recent piece about the influx of returned soldiers to the Mont Park (Hospital for the Insane 1912-1934) which made me delve deeper into available records held at the Public Record Office Victoria (PROV).

VPRS 7527 P1 Unit 1

Due to the nature of these records, the more recent files are closed under the privacy act, whereby if a record relates to a person this will be closed for 75 years from the date of creation (for adults) and for 99 years from the date of creation (for children). However, the timeframe in which I was looking was during and proceeding the years of the First World War. This time frame led me to unearth a box of records which relates specifically to the correspondence files of the ‘Military Mental Hospital’ at Mont Park.

These records are an insightful look into Mont Park Repatriation Hospital for returned soldiers and detail correspondence between such agencies as The Australian Red Cross Society, ‘the Lunacy Department’ and individuals seeking further information.

A few letters struck a particular cord; firstly the reply to a piece written to the editor of a newspaper in March 1925. This publication from the President of the Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Fathers’ Association of New South Wales was an objection relating to repatriated soldiers’ and ‘lunatics’ being housed together at Mont Park and Bundoora, thus slowing down the process of the returned soldiers’ recovery. The reply to this editorial piece came in the form of a letter from Dr. W. E. Jones. Inspector-General of the Insane. Dr. Jones stated that, ‘a very considerable number of returned soldiers have been sent to Lunatic Asylums, because their mental condition has been judged by the Department of Repatriation as not being due in any way to the stress of the war.’

Another piece of correspondence from a few years later in November 1927 ignited my interest. Dr. Jones wrote to the Deputy Commissioner in the Department of State Repatriation (Victoria) about one particular Private who had initially been voluntarily admitted to Bundoora, before being discharged and then subsequently immediately re-admitted under the Mental Treatment Act in 1925. The terse correspondence describes a battle between admitting the Private under the Mental Treatment Act rather than the Lunacy Act. Mr McPhee, the Deputy Commissioner argues that, ‘The Mental Treatment Act, it is understood, was introduced to protect the returned soldiers who became insane as the result of war service from the stigma of being certified as lunatics…’

These records are filled with correspondence relating to particular returned soldiers requesting leave, their mental capacity, queries from other Australian state departments as to the running of such institutions, and the disputes surrounding the reasons for soldiers needing to be housed in such institutions and classified as ‘lunatics’. It is an eye opening collection of correspondence which brings to light the aftermath of the bloody battle Australians fought to protect their King and country.

Phoebe Wilkens, Access Services Officer

VA 2846 Mont Park (Hospital for the Insane 1912-1934; Mental Hospital 1934-c.1970s; Mental/Psychiatric Hospital c.1970s-ct.)

VPRS 7424 Nominal Register of Patients

VPRS 7527 Military Mental Hospital Correspondence Files

New Records Transfers

New PROV logo BLACK

The below records have been transferred into the PROV collection and are now available for ordering and viewing in our North Melbourne reading room.

VA 2620 Registrar of Probates, Supreme Court (1960-ct)
VPRS 7591 / P19 Wills [1992]

VA 2549 Supreme Court
VPRS 17078 / P1 Draft Jury Roll [1959-1968]

VA 4204 Court of General Sessions, Melbourne [1852-1968]
VPRS 17020/P1 Criminal Presentments and Final Orders, Melbourne, Annual Single Number System [1902-1936]

VA 3707 Moonee Valley (City 1994-ct)
VA 898 Essendon (Borough 1882-1890; Town 1890-1909; City 1909-1994)
VPRS 16991 / P1 Annual Statement of Accounts [1882-1994]VPRS 16992 / P1 Rate Records, Computer Printouts [1979-1991]VPRS 17004 / P1 Deeds and Securities Register and Index [1899-1990]VPRS 17005 / P1 Building Permit Applications Register [1915-1974]VPRS 17009 / P1 Contract Register [1907-1978]

VA 3707 Moonee Valley (City 1994-ct)
VPRS 17010 / P1 Rate Records, Computer Printouts [1994-1996]

VA 3690 Greater Dandenong (City 1994-ct)
VPRS 14716 / P2 Council Minutes [2000-2004]

VA 3993 Dandenong I (Road District 1857-1873; Shire 1873-1955)
VPRS 17050 / P1 Valuation and Rate Books (1928-1944)

VA 4966  Corinella Cemetery Trust
VPRS 17045 / P1 Minute Book and Record of Burials
VPRS 17046 / P1 Receipt Book
VPRS 17047 / P1 Order Book
VPRS 17048 / P1 Order and Receipt Book

VA 3862  Corangamite Shire Council
VPRS 16770/ P2 Council Minutes
VPRS 17079/ P1 Subject Index Shire Minutes

VA 3673 Bayside (City 1994-ct)
VA 2505 Sandringham (Borough 1917-1919; Town 1919-1923; City 1923-1994)
VPRS 14659 / P2 Rate and Valuation Books [1917-1937]VRPS 14661 / P2 Rate and Valuation Cards [1937-1974]

VA 573 Brighton (Municipal District 1859-1963; Borough 1863-1887; Town 1887-1919; City 1923-1994)
VPRS 573 / P5 Rate and Valuation Books [1932]

The below records have been transferred into the PROV collection and are now available for ordering and viewing in our Ballarat reading room.

VA 3734 Horsham III (Rural City 1995-ct)
VPRS 16966 / P2 Council Agenda [2010]VPRS 16967 / P2 Council Minutes [2009]

VA 2440 Horsham II (Borough 1882-1932; Town 1932-1949; City 1949-1995)
VPRS 16969 / P2 Council Agenda [1986-1994]

Digging up the past: The Old Melbourne Cemetery

Just last week Melbourne’s Lord Mayor; Robert Doyle announced the state government’s intention to upgrade the Queen Victoria Market. This major project will inturn create thousands of jobs both in the market and its surrounds, as well as construction jobs.  Whilst this new upgrade might be great for the future of Melbourne, with the local economy likely to garner an abundance of new jobs, with additional tourist dollars flowing in; the historians amongst us may question the past.

What is today known as the Queen Victoria Market, a vast and vibrant iconic Melbourne institution that locals and tourists alike frequent, was once the Old Melbourne Cemetery. This burial ground was in existence from as early as 1837.  However, with the gradual expansion and encroachment of the market place, saw the slow demise of the cemetery holdings, with land increasingly being taken over for the purpose of the markets.

As early as 1877 sections of the original cemetery which was allocated to Aboriginal and Quaker burials, as well as unused sections of the Jewish area were taken over for the purpose of the growing market place.  In 1917 the final burial in the Old Melbourne Cemetery took place, with exhumations beginning in mid-1920 with only a ‘narrow strip of land affected’, and only marked graves exhumed.  The cemetery was eventually closed permanently by 1922, reportedly having been the final resting place for up to 10,000 early Victorian settlers.  However, with exhumations about to begin contention ensued, as there were many notable pioneers buried within the Old Melbourne Cemetery, who’s resting place would have to be disturbed in order to convert the space into market holdings. Such significant Victorians buried, included John Batman, the founder of Melbourne; Mr James Jackson, the first merchant in Melbourne; and Mr J. H. N. Cassell, the first Minister for Customs.

VPRS 9591/P0/1 Record of significant graves – Old Melbourne Cemetery

VPRS 9591/P0/1 Record of significant graves – Old Melbourne Cemetery – A TOOTAL

By the time exhumations were underway the responsibility fell to the Melbourne City Council, who identified 525 marked graves.  There remains, alongside many others were to be re-interred at the Fawkner General Cemetery, and later St Kilda, Melbourne General and Springvale Cemeteries.  However during further excavation works in the 1990s more remains were uncovered.  And again in 2011 the Melbourne City Council put together a plan for a proposed two-level underground car park at the markets, which brought the history of the site back into prominence, with Councillors arguing that the excavation of the site would not be ‘an issue’ if remains were to be uncovered.

VPRS 17131/P1/1 Correspondence, Old Melbourne Cemetery

VPRS 17131/P1/1 Correspondence, Old Melbourne Cemetery

Within the records held here at the Public Record Office Victoria (PROV) is a plethora of interesting information from the Old Melbourne Cemetery, which includes such things as notes on exhumations, correspondence and letter books regarding the Old Melbourne Cemetery and records of significant graves.  These records, along with Melbourne City Council minutes and records from the Board of Land and Works and the Public Works department can be a great starting point to dig a little deeper into the history that is the Queen Victoria Market.

Phoebe Wilkens
Access Services Officer
 

Records available at PROV by agency and series

VA 4779 Old Melbourne Cemetery Trust

VA 669 Board of Land and Works

VA 511 Melbourne City Council

VPRS 8915/P2/33 Valuation Field Books: Painsdale Place to Queen Victoria Market

VPRS 17131/P1/1 Correspondence, Old Melbourne Cemetery

VPRS 9588/P1/1 Notes on exhumations

VPRS 987/P0/1 Cemeteries, outward letter book

VPRS 9591/P0/1 Record of significant graves – Old Melbourne Cemetery

VPRS 9583/P3 Alphabetical record of burials – Old Melbourne Cemetery (digitised)

New Records Transfers

 New PROV logo BLACK

 The below records have been transferred into the PROV collection and are now available for ordering and viewing in our North Melbourne reading room.

VA 4925 Department of Business and Innovation
VPRS 16772 / P1 General Correspondence Files, Annual Single Number System
VPRS 16771 / P1 General Correspondence Files, Single Number System

VA 484:  Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEECD)
VPRS 16963 / P1 Central Correspondence Files – Annual Single Number System with Alpha

VA 4859 Victorian Law Reform Commission (2000-ct)
VPRS 16215 / P3 References and Community Law Reform Projects [2001-2012]VPRS 17022 / P1 Annual Reports and Financial Statements [2011-2011]

The below records have been transferred into the PROV collection and are now available for ordering and viewing in our Ballarat reading room.

VA 3730 Ararat III (Rural City 1994-ct)
VA 2375 Ararat I (Municipal District 1858, Borough 1858-1934; Town 1934-1950; City 1950-1994)
VPRS 16022 / P1 General Correspondence Files, Alpha-Numeric System [1977-1994]VPRS 16024 / P1 General Correspondence Files, Alpha-Numeric System, City Engineer [1977-1994]VPRS 16039 / P1 Index To Council Minutes [1909-1976]VPRS 16040 / P1 Committee Minutes [1909-1916]VPRS 16040 / P2 Committee Minutes [1966-1986]VPRS 16040 / P3 Committee Minutes [1974-1983]VPRS 16031 / P1 Notice of Motion Book [1872-1981]VPRS 16036 / P1 Balance Book and Statement of Accounts [1890- 1983] * (Unit 2 Closed s11)
VPRS 16037 / P1 General Ledger [1858-1966]VPRS 16032 / P1 Contract Register, Country Roads Board [1915-1940] * (Unit 1 Closed s11)
VPRS 16025 / P1 Register of Inward Correspondence [1903-1926] * (Unit 2 Closed s11)
VPRS 16037 / P1 Registered Premises Register [1921-1929]VPRS 16035 / P1 By Laws and Regulations [1874-1974]VPRS 16026 / P1 Authorised List of File Classifications [1974-1994]VPRS 12992 / P5 Rate Records [1858-1906] * (Unit 2 Closed s11)
VPRS 12992 / P6 Rate Records [1981-1994]VPRS 12994 / P2 Outward Letter Books [1904-1910] * (Units 1, 2 & 3 Closed s11)

VA 1948 Ararat Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16028 / P1 Minutes [1935-1984]VPRS 16029 / P1 House Connection Contract Register [1939-1951]VPRS 16027 / P1 Index to Authority Minutes [1981]VPRS 16023 / P1 General Correspondence Files, Alpha-Numeric System [1958-1980]

VA 2375 Ararat I (Municipal District 1858; Borough 1858-1934, Town 1934-1950; City 1950-1994) and
VA 1948 Ararat Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16033 / P1 Contract Register [1902-1957]VPRS 16038 / P1 Annual Reports [1957-1981]

VA 2056 Shire of Ararat Waterworks Trust and
VA 2042 Willaura Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16041 / P1 Minutes [1984]

VA 2376 Ararat II (Road District 1861-1864; Shire 1864-1994)
VPRS 12991 / P3 Council Minutes [1861-1867]

Creative Commons and Open Data Presentations

On the 24th October, Public Record Office Victoria (PROV) hosted a short event, showcased two well respected speakers, Mr. Neale Hooper and Ms. Pia Waugh.

Mr. Neale Hooper is an intellectual property and ICT lawyer who worked for over 20 years in the Queensland Government’s Crown Law Office (in the Department of Justice and Attorney General), providing specialist legal services in these areas.  Since 2005, Neale has been part of the Creative Commons Australia team, working on licence revisions and implementation and open data/open government policy development.  Neale was the principal lawyer for the Queensland Government’s Government Information Licensing Framework (GILF) Project, leading the legal work on the project from its inception in 2005. In 2010-2011 Neale was engaged as the Principal Project Implementation Manager for GILF in the Office of the Queensland Chief Information Officer, working on the implementation of CC licensing across all Queensland Government Departments.  He has consulted widely on CC licensing with Government agencies in Australia and overseas and is recognised internationally as an expert on CC licences.

In his presentation, Neale talked about how Creative Commons licensing is being used in Australia, particularly in the government sector, and provided an overview of recent developments (including the version 4.0 international licence suite).

Neale’s slides can be accessed at http://www.slideshare.net/ccAustralia/cc-and-government-in-australia-presentation-melbourne-24-october-2013 
For more information, the Creative Commons Australia page on Slideshare is located at http://www.slideshare.net/ccAustralia
 
Ms. Pia Waugh is currently working as a Director of Coordination and Gov 2.0 for the Australian Government CTO looking at whole of government technology, services and procurement. This is in the Department of Finance, itself a central agency focused on whole of government operations.  Prior to that she worked in the ACT Government as an Open Government Policy Advisor and on the data ACT open data platform, the first of it’s kind in Australia.  

In her presentation, Pia discussed what is happening in open data throughout Australia and how it will help government agencies in all spheres of government to do our work more efficiently and effectively. She outlined the data.gov.au improvements and roadmap, and how that fits in the broader landscape of opening up government public sector information.

Pia’s slides can be accessed here http://www.slideshare.net/alankong98478/open-data-presentation-2013-v0-5  

A copy of the mind map is located at  http://www.mindmeister.com/328942651/the-government-data-landscape-in-australia

Pia’s blog on her NZ Open Data and Digital Government Adventure –  http://pipka.org/2012/12/18/my-nz-open-data-and-digital-government-adventure/

Pia’s blog on OKFestival 2012: Open Data, Open Gov & Open Science in Helsinki – http://pipka.org/2012/10/02/okfestival-2012-open-data-open-gov-open-science-in-helsinki/

Overall reception received was excellent.  The presentations opened up further dialogue and interest among colleagues, particularly on the use of creative commons and open data and how that benefit government operations.

New Records Transfers

New PROV logo BLACK

The below records have been transferred into the PROV collection and are now available for ordering and viewing in our North Melbourne reading room.

VA 4952: Grampians Wimmera Mallee Water Corporation
VA 4953 Charlton Waterworks Trust
VPRS 16941 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1898 to 1907]

VA 1977 Edenhope Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16942 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1973 to 1984]

VA 4955 Hindmarsh Water Board
VPRS 16943 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1992 to 1995]

VA 1989 Horsham Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16958 / P1 Engineers’ Report [1968 to 1983]

VA 1989 Horsham Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16944 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1945 to 1983]

VA 2103 Horsham Waterworks Trust
VPRS 16959 / P1 Engineers’ Report [1939 to 1983]

VA 2103 Horsham Waterworks Trust
VPRS 16961 / P1 (Finance Committee) Committee Minutes [1896 to 1909]

VA 2103 Horsham Waterworks Trust
VPRS 16984 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1883 to 1981]

VA 4036 Wimmera United Waterworks / VA 723 State Rivers and Water Supply Commission
VPRS 16974 / P1 Register and Index of Benchmarks [1889 to 1945]

VA723 State Rivers and Water Supply Commission / VA 2338 RuralWater Commission / VA 4234 Rural Water Corporation
VPRS 16975 / P1 Stadia Field Books (S prefix) [1957 to 1993]

VA 3749 Wimmera-Mallee Rural Water Authority
VPRS 16976 / P1  Level Books (T prefix) [1998 to 1999]

VA 723 State Rivers and Water Supply Commission / VA 2338 Rural Water Commission / VA 4234 Rural Water Corporation / VA 3749 Wimmera-Mallee Rural Water Authority
VPRS 16977 / P1 Level Books (L prefix) [1935-2003]

VA 723 State Rivers and Water Supply Commission
VPRS 16985 / P1 Field Books F [1960- 1980]

VA 2031 St Arnaud Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16978 / P1 Field Books [1948]

VA 2031 St Arnaud Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16979 / P1 Grid Book [1948-1949]

VA 2031 St Arnaud Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16980 / P1 Level Books [1948]

VA 2031 St Arnaud Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16981 / P1 Level Control Book [1948-1949]

VA 4961 Stawell Water Board
VPRS 16956 / P1 Index to Minutes [1989 to 1994]

VA 4961 Stawell Water Board
VPRS 16950 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1989 to 1995]

VA 2042 Warracknabeal Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16982 / P1 Contract Register, House Connection [1940 to 1959]

VA 2042 Warracknabeal Sewerage Authority / VA 2221 Warracknabeal Water Board / VA 3749 Wimmera-Mallee Rural Water Authority
VPRS 16960 / P1 Contract Register [1939 to 1996]

VA 2042 Warracknabeal Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16955 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1938 to 1983]

VA 4957 Warracknabeal Waterworks Trust (1981 to 1983) / VA 2221 Warracknabeal Water Board  (1983 to 1994)
VPRS 16957 / P1 Contract Register [1981 to 1994]

VA 2221 Warracknabeal Water Board
VPRS 16951 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1983 to 1994]

VA 4957 Warracknabeal Waterworks Trust
VPRS 16952 / P1 Meeting Minutes 1906 to 1983

VA 4962 West Charlton Waterworks Trust
VPRS 16962 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1908 to 1927] [1883 to 1983]

VA 1992 Jeparit Sewerage Authority (1970 to 1984) / VA 4955 Hindmarsh Water Board  (1985 to1993)
VPRS 16945 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1970 to 1993]

VA 2111 Kowree Waterworks Trust (1947 to 1984) / VA 2563 Kowree Water Board (1984 to 1995)
VPRS 16946 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1947 to 1995]

VA 4833 Lowan Shire Waterworks Trust
VPRS 17011 / P1 Contract Register [1883 to 1915]

VA 2014 Nhill Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16953 / P1 Index to Minutes [1967 to 1981]

VA 2014 Nhill Sewerage Authority
VPRS 16947 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1938 to 1983]

VA 2246 Nhill Water Board
VPRS 16948 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1984 to 1988]

VA 4958 Nhill Waterworks Trust
VPRS 16954 / P1 Index to Minutes [1967 to 1981]

VA 4958 Nhill Waterworks Trust
VPRS 16949 / P1 Meeting Minutes [1898 to 1983]

Why is Melbourne Cup Day a public holiday?

The first assertions to provide for a public holiday on Melbourne Cup Day were made in 1873.  At that time provisions existed to allow for the proclamation of special bank holidays under the Bank Holidays Act of that year and for special civil service holidays under the Civil Service Act.  Although these holidays were proclaimed by the Governor in Council and then published in the Government Gazette, the task of preparing documentation and making recommendations to the Governor was the responsibility of the Chief Secretary’s Department.

On 30 October 1873, the Department prepared the necessary documentation for the birthday of the Prince of Wales (9 November) to be declared a special public holiday under the Civil Service Act.  William Henry Odgers, the Under Secretary of the Department annotated the margin with “Also the “Cup” Day sug[gests]s CS [Chief Secretary]”.  This was duly approved by Chief Secretary James Goodall Francis.  The documentation for the proclamation of Cup Day (6 November) was also added to the Bank Holiday proclamation for the Prince’s birthday.

But this did not please everyone.  The file containing these arrangements (VPRS 3991/P0, unit 710, file 73/C15451) also contains a letter of complaint from the Society for Promoting Morality.  It argued that the proclamation of the public holiday may lead to young men “…contracting the habit of “gambling”.”  It is unclear whether this had any effect but a Cup Day was not proclaimed the following year.  By this time Chief Secretary Francis had vacated his position and this might appear to bear our Odgers’ annotation of the previous year that the holiday was his idea.

The 1874 Cup meeting was the last one to be run on a Thursday.  In 1875 it was moved to the second Tuesday of the month.  This meant the Cup was to be run on 9 November, the Prince of Wales birthday.  As a result civil service and bank holidays were gazetted.

So, did the Victorian Racing Club (VRC) move the day for the Cup meeting in 1875 to a Tuesday in order to take advantage of a likely public holiday?  Or was it soliciting a public holiday irrespective of the day?  In this respect it is worth noting that in 1876, the Secretary of the VRC, R.C. Bagot wrote to the Chief Secretary with the following proposal:

“Will you make Tuesday 7th a holiday instead of Thursday 9th.  Sir James informed me it was in your hand.”  (VPRS 3992/P0, unit 883, item 76/K13038, file 76/K13126.)  “Sir James” was most likely Sir James McCulloch, the Premier at the time.

William Odgers subsequently annotated this item to record that the Chief Secretary had “seen” Mr Bagot but did not disclose any further detail.  Subsequent to this meeting both of the 7th and 9th November were Gazetted as Civil Service and Bank holidays.

From then on the precedent appears to have been set and a special public holiday for the Cup was proclaimed annually.  The extent of coverage of the act was adjusted via these annual proclamations over time and legislation specifically providing for a public holiday on the first Tuesday of November was not enacted until the Public Holidays Act of 1993.

Cup day

Tragedy at Ross Bridge – Irish Famine Orphans

When Catherine Toland (or Tolland) arrived on the “Lady Kennaway” with her sister, Sarah, to start a new life half a world away from her native Donegal, she could never have imagined the tragedy that would occur in her life.
 
Catherine married Michael Murphy, a Shepherd, in 1850 at St. Francis Catholic Church in Melbourne and went on to give birth to eleven children – only three of whom would survive to adulthood.
 
It is undeniably tragic to lose one child but to lose eight children – four of them in the one devastating incident – must have been unbearable and enough to threaten any parent’s sanity and will to go on living.
 
Early one morning in 1863, Catherine left the family’s slab hut with her husband and four children still asleep in bed, When Michael left shortly after, the children – John, William, Elizabeth and Michael James – were all still in bed. At approximately 8:00, smoke was noticed in the direction of the Murphy’s hut and the landowner, James McDonald, was informed.  On arrival, Mr. McDonald found the hut ablaze and partially collapsed and was unable to locate the children. 
 
He went to where Michael Murphy was minding sheep and, on return to the hut, found that the fire had died down and they were able to retrieve the bodies of the four children – still in their beds.
 
All this information can be found in the Witness Depositions for the Coroner’s Inquest into the deaths of the young children – how heartbreaking must it have been for Catherine to relate the sequence of events that resulted in the deaths of four of her children?
 
Catherine died in 1899 and left all her estate (which included a town allotment in Kerang) to her sole surviving child, Sarah Ellen Gleeson (nee Murphy).
 
You can read more of Catherine’s story – don’t forget to follow the link to Records relating to Catherine Tolland to view the rest of the Inquest (VPRS 24/P0000/124 File ref. 1863/149).
VPRS 24-p0-124 ref 1863 149 page 9 sml

If you are a descendant of Catherine’s or a Researcher who knows more of Catherine’s story, I would love to hear from you either through this Blog or by emailing enquiries@prov.vic.gov.au

Showcase Record – November 2013

Showcase Record – November 2013

VPRS 947/P0 Inward Overseas Passenger Lists 1852 – 1923

Immigration Records:

Immigration records that are held by Public Record Office Victoria (PROV) provide information about the administration of inward and outward immigration for Victoria. The inwards records relate to both assisted immigrants and those who came unassisted or were privately sponsored.

The term “unassisted” was used to describe passengers that paid their own fare, to distinguish them from passengers that migrated under sponsorship schemes, known as “assisted passengers”.

Famous People of the Past on our Unassisted Passenger Lists:

The assisted, unassisted and outward passenger lists have all been fully indexed and are available to search online. When searching these indexes you can find famous people of the past listed. Two of these world famous people are Saint Mary Mackillop of the Cross, who is just listed on there as Mary Mackillop and her profession/calling is listed as Nun, The other famous person is Dame Nellie Melba who is listed on there as Mme Melba and her profession/calling is listed as Lady.

 

Saint Mary Mackillop of the Cross:

Mary Mackillop was travelling back from Rome, Italy in October 1874 onboard the ship the SS St Osyth. She made it back into Melbourne, Victoria on January 1875. Mary Mackillop, as we all know is a world famous Australian who was beatified on 19 January 1995 in Sydney, Australia by Pope John Paul II  and then canonised and recognised as Saint Mary Mackillop of the Cross on 17 October 2010 at St Peters Basilica in Vatican City, Rome by Pope Benedict XVI.

Mary MacKillop 1_20130723_201190

Dame Nellie Melba:

Dame Nellie Melba was travelling back from Marseilles, France in February 1909 onboard the ship the SS Orontes. She made it back into Melbourne, Victoria on March 1909. Dame Nellie Melba who was born in Richmond, Victoria on 19 May 1861, was a world famous operatic soprano and prima donna. She was one of the most famous singers of the late Victorian era.Dame Nellie Melba was travelling back to Melbourne in 1909 because she was embarking on a concert tour of Australia.

MME Melba 1_20130723_201193

Various Creating Agencies:

Colonial Secretary’s Office: VA 856, 1852 – 1855

Department of Trade and Customs: VA 606, 1855 – 1900

Public Works Department: VA 669, 1900 – 1923

 

Agencies currently responsible:

Public Record Office Victoria: VA 683, 1973-continued

Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs, State Office, Victoria: VA 4369, 1996-cont.

Charlie Spiteri – Access Services Officer

New Records Transfers

New PROV logo BLACK

The below records have been transferred into the PROV collection and are now available for ordering and viewing in our North Melbourne reading room.

VA 3727 City of Yarra
VA 2494 Richmond City Council
VPRS 12892 / P2 Voters’ Rolls, Ward Order [1870 to 1973]VPRS 12895 / P2 Rate and Valuation Register, Assessment Number Order [1963 to 1978]VPRS 16671 / P1 Index to Inward Correspondence [1856 to 1875]VPRS 16669 / P1 Inward Correspondence, Annual Single Number System [1856 to 1876]VPRS 16672 / P1 Mayor’s Correspondence [1905 to 1912]VPRS 16673 / P1 City Surveyor’s Correspondence [1898 to 1907]

VA 4931 Yarra-Melbourne Regional Library Corporation
VPRS 16676 / P1 Board Papers, Minutes and Agenda [1995 to 2007]VPRS 16677 / P1 Correspondence and Subject Files, CEO [1995 to 2006]VPRS 16678 / P1 Committee Minutes, Agenda and Papers [1996 to 2007]VPRS 16679 / P1 Confidential Board Papers, Minutes and Agenda [1999 to 2007]VPRS 16680 / P1 Enterprise Bargaining Agreement Files [1996 to 2006]

VA 511 Melbourne City Council
VPRS 16940 / P1 By Laws  [1862 to 1965]VPRS 16675 / P2 Rates and Valuation Cards [1960 to 1977]

VA 3727 City of Yarra
VA 2494  City of Richmond
VPRS 16668 / P1 Subject Correspondence Files [1858 to 1956]VPRS 16670 / P1 Inward Correspondence, Alphabetical [1877 to 1952]

VA 2989 Cabinet Office
VPRS 11935 / P3 Cabinet Records [1918]

VA 4838 Department of Planning and Community Development (DPCD)
VPRS 16156 / P2 Country Victoria and Metropolitan Region Planning Scheme Ordinances, Interim Development Orders and Approved Amendments
VPRS 16260 / P3 Guide to Melbourne Metropolitan Planning Scheme (MMPC) and Interim Development Orders (IDO) Maps in VPRS 16157 and Planning Scheme Amendment Maps in VPRS 16155

The below records have been transferred into the PROV collection and are now available for ordering and viewing in our Ballarat reading room.

VA 3708 Moorabool (Shire 1994-ct)
VA 967 Ballan (Road District 1862-1864; Shire 1864-1994)
VPRS 16965 / P1 Register of Rateable Properties, Cards [1946-1987]

VA 2378 Bacchus Marsh II (Shire 1871-1994)
VPRS 16988 / P1 Register of Rateable Properties, Cards [1964-1979]

VA 3734 Horsham III (Rural City 1995-ct)
VPRS 16966 / P1 Council Agenda Books [1995-2008]VPRS 16967 / P1 Council Minute Books [1995-2008]VPRS 16973 / P1 Minutes and Agenda Books, Committee of Management, Horsham Regional Art Gallery [1983-1994]

VA 2440 Horsham II (Borough 1882-1932; Town 1932-1949; City 1949-1995)
VPRS 16968 / P1 Council Minute Books [1883-1994]VPRS 16969 / P1 Council Agenda Books [1992-1995]VPRS 16971 / P1 Council Committee Minute Books [1889-1994]VPRS 16972 / P1 Notices of Motion [1966-1984]

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