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Victorian Archives Centre public opening hours

Monday to Friday: 10:00 am to 4:30 pm
(excl. public holidays)
The second and last Saturday of every month

Introducing the latest IM3 tool

A black and white image that says 'IM3' in building blocks with the words 'Information Management Maturity Measurement' underneithPublic Record Office Victoria has just released the latest version of IM3 (v.1.5).

What is the IM3?

Public Record Office Victoria developed the Information Management Maturity Measurement Tool (IM3) in 2013.

Made up of a questionnaire and support documents, IM3 helps measure compliance with whole of Victorian Government Information Management (IM) standards and assess an organisation’s ability to meet IM best practice.

What’s changed?

The latest version of IM3 includes more consistent language and up-to-date links to Victorian Government IM policies, standards, guidelines and legislation. Content regarding information privacy and security has also been updated to reflect requirements of the Privacy and Data Protection Act 2014

Why use IM3?

Results from this assessment can be used to:

  • Better identify areas of IM in the organisation that need attention
  • Assist in setting goals for IM capability and skills development
  • Support a case for resources or initiatives to improve information and records management.

How to access IM3?

To access IM3, simply download the tool from the PROV website.

If you would like more information about using the IM3 please email agency.queries@prov.vic.gov.au.

 

Family life on Victorian soldier settlement blocks

The Victorian Soldier Settlement Scheme was heralded as a new beginning. Servicemen and women returning from fighting in World War 1 were offered blocks of farm land to help rebuild their lives.

The Soldier On: WW1 Soldier Settler Stories exhibition, now showing at Old Treasury Building, uncovers the fascinating stories of these soldier settlers. Here is just a taste of one of the themes of the exhibition – family life…

Family life on the farms

On many soldier settler blocks, the work of the youngest family members was vital. Children contributed regularly to the day-to-day functioning of the farm, allowing settlers to save on labour costs. Leslie Kirby, a Mallee settler, attributed his block’s success to ‘the labour of my wife and two sons’.

Compulsory schooling was a burden for many families, taking the children away from the fields. Organisations such as the Victorian Farmers’ Union and the Australian Housewives Association protested the ‘slavery of little children’ on farms. At the same time, the Closer Settlement Board urged settlers to use the cost-saving labour of their wives and children.

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Farming was a family affair. On dairy farms, milking was often the work of the women and children; even toddlers accompanied their mothers to the cowsheds, learning from an early age how to help. This photograph was taken on the Chocolyn Soldier Settler Estate, in the Western District, Victoria. Photograph courtesy Shirley Russell, daughter of soldier settler James Murrie Fleming.

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Feeding the calves, Chocolyn Soldier Settler Estate, Western District, Victoria, c.1930. Photograph courtesy Les Anderson.

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Daughter of soldier settler Arthur T. Drinkwater sleeping on the verandah at their home in Annuello, Victoria, c.1950. Courtesy George Drinkwater, son of soldier settler Arthur T. Drinkwater.

Living conditions

Some soldier settler families were able to build a home with their own savings, or by using money loaned to them by the Closer Settlement Board. For these families, life was relatively comfortable. Other families were not so lucky.

The burden of loan repayments, poor crop yields or a lack of savings forced many settlers to live in tents, or in homes made of canvas or hessian bags, scrap tin, or wattle and daub. These ‘bag humpies’ were far from weatherproof, and a difficult setting in which to rear children.

The back of a farm house showing two water tanks.

Photograph of a soldier settler’s ‘bag humpy’ at Nandaly, in 1921. Courtesy Museum Victoria.

Soldier On: WW1 Soldier Settler Stories is presented by Old Treasury Building in partnership with Public Record Office Victoria, and is supported by the Australian Government’s Anzac Centenary Arts and Culture Fund.

Christmas Closures

12903-P0001-000865-040Visitors please note the following Christmas closures:

Victorian Archives Centre
Closing early 12 noon Fri 18 December
Closing for Christmas 3pm Thurs 24 December
Reopening 10am Mon 4 January 2016 

Cafe 99 will be closed from 3pm Fri 18 December to Tues 19 January at 8am. 

Ballarat Archives Centre
Closing for Chistmas 4.30pm Tues 22 December
Reopening 9.30am Mon 4 January 2016

Bendigo Regional Archives Centre
Closed on Wed 2 December
Closing for Christmas 3pm Thurs 24 December
Reopening 10am Weds 6 January 2016

Geelong Heritage Centre
Closed on Fri 25, Sat 26 & Mon 28 December
Closed on Fri 1 January 2016

 

Victorian Gold Jubilee Exhibition Anniversary

 

Victorian Gold Jubilee Exhibition Entries vol, complete with gold lettering and leather trim.

Victorian Gold Jubilee Exhibition Entries vol, complete with gold lettering and leather trim.

This month marks the 114th anniversary of the commencement of the Victorian Gold Jubilee Exhibition, held at Bendigo from 13 November 1901 to 14 May 1902.

Here, Dr. Michele Matthews from the Bendigo Regional Archives shares the story of the two volumes created to record the details of this exhibition, available to order and view at the Bendigo Regional Archives Centre:

The volume of greater interest has the sub-heading “Entries” on its front leather cover. The hundreds of exhibits displayed in the exhibition were itemised in detail.

The name and address of each exhibitor, a description of each exhibit, its value in pound and which display court it was allocated to are all listed. The courts were numbered from one, or had titles like “Machinery”, “Agricultural”, “Naval & Military Court” and “Art”.

The female visitors to the Exhibition were able to view exhibits deemed suitable for the fairer sex and located within their own “Women’s Court”. There were exhibits such as “Parasols & Umbrellas”, cotton and haberdashery from Manchester and Staffordshire, “Corsets & Embroideries” from Paris.

The most valuable exhibits were mining machinery such as Taylor Horsfield’s £850 “Air Compressor & Rock Borer”. “Bohemian Glassware” brought down from Sydney was valued at £600.

The profits from this Exhibition were used to fund the sculpture known as the Gold Monument, which still gazes along Pall Mall (from the McCrae Street end). The Exhibition’s Cash Book shows payments, which totalled £1160, were made to then up and coming sculptor C.D.Richardson. Recently a City of Greater Bendigo staff member used both these volumes to write a detailed report about this monument, for Heritage Victoria.

VA 2389, Victorian Gold Jubilee Exhibition-Bendigo Cash Book, 1 vol.

VA 2389, Victorian Gold Jubilee Exhibition-Bendigo Cash Book, 1 vol.

 

Request for Feedback – Accredited and Non-Accredited Training Retention and Disposal Authorities

iStock_000019659642_LargeThe PROV Appraisal and Documentation Team invites stakeholders to review two new draft Retention and Disposal Authorities (RDAs) for records related to Accredited Training functions, and Non-Accredited Training functions.

The aim of the RDAs, once they are issued as Standards, is to provide for the lawful disposal of records not required permanently after specified time periods.

Please find copies of the two draft RDAs below, along with a brief report outlining the background, scope, format and appraisal justifications for the RDAs.

We would appreciate feedback on any of the following:

  • Is the language used in the RDAs clear enough?
  • Can you identify any gaps in the RDA coverage?
  • Are the retention periods reasonable?

Please provide any feedback to agency.queries@prov.vic.gov.au by COB Friday 11 December 2015.

 

 

Soldier On: WW1 Soldier Settler Stories now open

  • A photo of a soldier settler campsite including tents, soldier settlers, their dogs and horses
    A photo from the archives featured in the Soldier On exhibition: PROV VPRS 14517 P1 Unit 34 L533

A new exhibition about the Victorian soldier settler experience is now showing at Old Treasury Building.

Soldier On: WW1 Soldier Settler Stories features records from the state archives of Public Record Office Victoria revealing previously untold stories of the Victorian soldier settler experience.

Between 1918 and 1934 the Soldier Settlement Scheme helped settle some 11,000 returned soldiers on farming land across the state through government leases.

Through original archival records, as well as first-hand video and photos, the exhibition will take visitors through the establishment of the WW1 Soldier Settlement Scheme in Victoria and the harsh realities of life on a soldier settlement farm. 

Here we’ve collated a snapshot of some of the archival photos to be found in the exhibition:

Image courtesy of the Victorian Government for Soldier On: WW1 Soldier Settler Stories

Handbooks circulated in the 1920s providing cheerful and optimistic advice to immigrants and returned soldiers. A ‘land fit for heroes’ was the promise: propserous farms, contented families and thriving regional development. Image courtesy of the Victorian Government.

 

The families and soldiers that moved onto the blocks had to rebuild their lives from scratch: building houses, erecting fences and looking after crops and stock. Life on a Victorian soldier settlement block, Public Record Office Victoria VPRS 14517 P1 Unit 34 L536.

The families and soldiers that moved onto the blocks had to rebuild their lives from scratch: building houses, erecting fences and looking after crops and stock. Life on a Victorian soldier settlement block, Public Record Office Victoria VPRS 14517 P1 Unit 34 L536.

 

In the lottery for land, some soldier settlers were lucky enough to secure a good block. Some farms remained free from the ravages of pests and disease – others were not so lucky. Image of the mice plagues courtesy of the Victorian Government.

In the lottery for land, some soldier settlers were lucky enough to secure a good block. Some farms remained free from the ravages of pests and disease – others were not so lucky. Image of the mice plagues courtesy of the Victorian Government.

 

Settler women were helped by initiatives such as the ‘Better Farming Train’, which featured demonstrations on household affairs. Image of the Better Farming Train courtesy of the Victorian Government.

Settler women were helped by initiatives such as the ‘Better Farming Train’, which featured demonstrations on household affairs. Image of the Better Farming Train courtesy of the Victorian Government.

 

Soldier On: WW1 Soldier Settler Stories is presented by Old Treasury Building in partnership with Public Record Office Victoria, and is supported by the Australian Government’s Anzac Centenary Arts and Culture Fund.

Visit oldtreasurybuilding.org.au for more information or discover your WW1 soldier settler ancestors at soldiersettlement.prov.vic.gov.au

 

Victorian history projects honoured at the 2015 Victorian Community History Awards

81 - Jean GalbraithA book about the life of one of Australia’s most loved gardeners and writers has been announced as the 2015 Victorian Community History Award winner at a ceremony held at the Arts Centre earlier today.  

Jean Galbraith: Writer in a Valley by Gippsland historian Dr Meredith Fletcher was recognised as this year’s most outstanding community history project in Victoria. Jean Galbraith was a respected Gippsland botanist who developed new forms of garden writing in Australia.

Graeme Davison’s new book Lost Relations won the judges special prize for a narrative that takes the reader on a journey to discover his family’s past, while Lucy Sussex’s book about Fergus Hume and his famous Melbourne crime novel ‘Mystery of a Hansom Cab’ took out the 2015 History Publication Award. Suburban Melbourne, Ned Kelly and the ANZACs also featured amongst the winning entries.

The Victorian Community History Awards are presented by Public Record Office Victoria in partnership with the Royal Historical Society of Victoria, and funded by the Victorian Government.

A major event of History Week, the annual Victorian Community History Awards recognise the work of individuals and organisations committed to telling stories of local history.

List of the 2015 Victorian Community History Award winners:

Victorian Community History Award
Jean Galbraith: Writer in a Valley by Meredith Fletcher
Monash University Publishing in association with State Library of Victoria

Judges Special Prize
Lost Relations: Fortunes of My Family in Australia’s Golden Age by Graeme Davison
Allen & Unwin

Collaborative Community Award
Ned Kelly Under the Microscope; Solving the Forensic Mystery of Ned Kelly’s Remains edited by Craig Cormick
CSIRO Publishing

Local History Project Award
Strewth! An Insight into Local Involvement in World War One edited by Gillian and John Francis
Horsham Historical Society

History Publication Award
Block Buster! Fergus Hume and the Mystery of a Hansom Cab by Lucy Sussex
Text Publishing

Local History – Small Publication Award
Boroondara Remembers: Stories of World War 1 by Fiona Poulton and Katherin Sheedy
City of Boroondara

Multimedia History Award
Postcards from Port: An Audiovisual Retrospective of Port Melbourne DVD
Port Melbourne Historical and Preservation Society

Historical Interpretation Award
Melbourne Dreaming: A Guide to Important Places of the Past and Present by Meyer Eidelson
Aboriginal Studies Press

Centenary of World War One Award
Suburbs at War: The Cities of Malvern and Prahran during the Great War by Helen Doyle
City of Stonnington

History Article (Peer Reviewed) Award
Anzac Memories Revisited: Trauma, Memory and Oral History by Alistair Thomson
Oral History Review, Oxford University Press

For more information and to view commendations read the 2015 Winners Booklet.
View photos from the awards ceremony on our Flickr page.
View the official announcement.

Capture Standard Refresh

Magnifying lens  on the stack of old filesPublic Record Office Victoria (PROV) is currently reviewing its Capture Standard and associated products. Current Capture Standard documents can be found here.

We’re inviting interested stakeholders to participate in the review.

Consultation will take place during November and December 2015 and will likely consist of a survey or interview (approx. one hour), depending on the number of participants. There will also be a subsequent opportunity to comment on the review recommendations and/or proposed Capture Standard products. Your feedback would be highly valued in assisting to improve PROV products.

The Refresh will have a focus on digitisation requirements and digital signatures, although feedback on all aspects of capture is welcome.

To indicate your interest please email standards@prov.vic.gov.au with the heading ‘Capture Standard Refresh’ by COB Friday 16th October.

PROV intends to complete the Capture Standard Refresh by mid year 2016.

Report finds systematic recordkeeping failures across Victorian government

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Click on image to view

Greater emphasis and investment in information management within agencies is critical to avoiding waste and loss of public confidence.

Earlier this year Public Record Office Victoria, in conjunction with Landell, completed a review of the compliance of Victorian Government agencies with their records management obligations prescribed by the Public Records Act (1973).  

David Brown, Assistant Director Government Services, explained “Over the years PROV has observed a significant trend of recordkeeping non-compliance within Government departments, agencies and other Victorian public bodies in our jurisdiction. We commissioned Landell to help investigate if this non-compliance is systematic and what, if any patterns could be determined regarding instances of non-compliance that had been identified.”

The Review examined the 224 reports published by Victorian Auditor-General’s Office (VAGO) and the Victorian Ombudsman (VO) between 2010 and 2014. Records management failures were identified in over half of them. It found that rather than being isolated incidents, records management failures are systemic, chronic and pervasive.

VO reports aim to investigate situations where some form of ‘wrong-doing’ or administrative failure has occurred, or was thought to have occurred. It was therefore expected that some records management failures would be identified in the VO reports. In contrast, it was anticipated that the VAGO audit reports would identify records management failures to a lesser extent, as VAGO audits evaluate government agency performance. However this was not the case. The consistent appearance of records management failures across both sets of reports supports the conclusion that this is a systemic issue, rather than the result of multiple ‘one-off’ events.

It is clear from this Review that:

  • There is a pattern of systematic and ongoing records management failures within Victorian Government departments and agencies.
  • The records management failures hinder investigation by VAGO or VO.
  • Over the five years considered, at least 54% of reports included some form of records management failure or concern. This figure reached as high as 84% in the most recent year considered (2014).
  • Almost all Departments appeared more than once over the entire period of review.
  • Victorian Governments give insufficient regard to the value of information throughout its entire life. This devaluation reduces accountability, lowers public respect, increases costs and lowers productivity.

The Review concluded that record keeping failures are an extensive and ongoing concern for Victorian Government departments and agencies.

The report is now available on the Landell website.

If you want to know more about the Review, contact us at standards@prov.vic.gov.au

 

A new exhibition is coming to Old Treasury Building

  • A photo of a soldier settler campsite including tents, soldier settlers, their dogs and horses
    A photo from the archives featured in the Soldier On exhibition: PROV VPRS 14517 P1 Unit 34 L533

After a successful eight months of nostalgia at the Old Treasury Building, School Days: Education in Victoria is set to close in October, making way for a new exhibition from 9 November. 

Soldier On:  WW1 Soldier Settler Stories features records straight from our archives, revealing previously untold stories of the Victorian soldier settler experience.

The exhibition will take visitors through the establishment of the WW1 Soldier Settlement Scheme in Victoria and the harsh realities of life on a soldier settlement farm, through to the 1925 Royal Commission and beyond.

Between 1918 and 1934, the Soldier Settlement Scheme helped settle around 11,000 returned soldiers on farming land across the state through government leases. From the exhibition’s original records, as well as first-hand video and photo accounts, discover how the Scheme shaped the Victorian landscape as we know it today.      

Soldier On:  WW1 Soldier Settler Stories is presented by Old Treasury Building in partnership with Public Record Office Victoria, and is supported by the Australian Government’s Anzac Centenary Arts and Culture Fund.

What: Soldier On:  WW1 Soldier Settler Stories
Where:
Old Treasury Building, Spring Street, Melbourne.
When:
Soldier On:  WW1 Soldier Settler Stories is showing from 9 November until 15 August 2016.
Open Sunday through to Friday 10am-4pm (closed Saturdays).
Bookings: This is a FREE exhibition. Bookings not required. 

Visit oldtreasurybuilding.org.au for visitor information or discover your WW1 soldier settler ancestors at soldiersettlement.prov.vic.gov.au.

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