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(excl. public holidays)
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Werribee Farm

MMBW Type Drawings for the Sewerage of the Metropolis, collated for the Greater Britain Exhibition, 1899 and the Universal International Exhibition, Paris 1900

Werribee was the perfect site for the MMBW’s new sewage farm. The farm was the Board’s most important project, and one of the largest public works undertaken in Australia in the nineteenth century.

Land at Werribee was cheaper than at Mordialloc – the other site considered. Rainfall was low compared with the rest of Melbourne, which meant the land would adapt well to irrigation. Werribee was also 9 miles (14.4 KM) away from the nearest boundary of the metropolitan district (Williamstown), and 24 miles (38.6 KM) away from the influential and well-to-do suburb of Brighton. The Chirnside family sold 8,857 acres (3.2 hectares) to the Board for 17 pounds per acre.

The Earl of Hopetoun, Governor of Victoria, turned the first sod of earth in a ceremony on May 1892, which marked the beginning of the building of the outfall sewer near Werribee.

 

 

Connection!

Surveys created to map Melbourne's complex sewerage system

On 5 February 1898, a ceremony marked the official connection of Melbourne to the new sewerage system. Guests – politicians, Board members, city councillors and federal delegates – boarded a steamer to watch the Governor, Lord Brassey, raise the penstock (the partition between the smaller and larger sewers) at the Australian Wharf. They then visited the pumping station at Spotswood and the sewage farm at Werribee. Horses and carts conveyed the 180 guests around the farm.

MMBW Type Drawings for the Sewerage of the Metropolis, collated for the Greater Britain Exhibition, 1899 and the Universal International Exhibition, Paris 1900

 

 

 

 

 

After lunch and toasts, many of which looked forward to the future of a federated Australia, MMBW Chairman Mr Fitzgibbon proudly declared it ‘was not a question of how much the scheme was going to cost, but how much it was going to save in the lives of the citizens. Before the work was completed he hoped to see those puny punsters and petty wits who spoke of Melbourne as Marvellous Smellbourne constrained to speak of her as one of the sweetest and healthiest cities of the world.’

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