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Victorian Archives Centre public opening hours

Monday to Friday: 10:00 am to 4:30 pm
(excl. public holidays)
The second and last Saturday of every month

Ballarat in 1916

  • VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 110, File “Tourist Bureau 1916”, General Correspondence Files, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

The world was in its second year of war in 1916. Despite all the upheaval it was still very much business as usual in Ballarat and everyday events of life in a vibrant community still went on regardless. Services still had to be provided, laws maintained and the future and wellbeing of the community considered.

The following selection of records are part of the Ballarat Archives Centre collection, and are drawn from inward and outward correspondence, mayoral reports and minutes of the City of Ballarat and the Town of Ballarat East. They give a view of some aspects of the life and times in Ballarat in 1916.

Still in the dark in 1916

Electricity first came to Ballarat in 1894 however in 1916 many streets, homes and business premises were still lit by candles, oil and gas lamps. The electrification of the city required a network of infrastructure enabling the system to be established consistently and progress was slow to spread throughout the landscape, it would take many more years to achieve a fully electrified city. 

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 109, File “Electric Supply Misc. 1916”, General Correspondence Files, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 109, File “Electric Supply Misc. 1916”, General Correspondence Files, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

 

VPRS 8117/P1 Unit 15, Outward Letter Book, Ballaarat East (Municipal District 1857-1863; Borough 1863-1870; Town 1872-1921)

VPRS 8117/P1 Unit 15, Outward Letter Book, Ballaarat East (Municipal District 1857-1863; Borough 1863-1870; Town 1872-192

 

First Flying School in Australia!

The aeroplane was still a new technology in 1916 and very much a novelty to both man and beast. Forward thinking gentlemen of the Ballarat community were ever ready to pounce on any new and innovative enterprise that could benefit Ballarat as seen in this correspondence.

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 110, File “Miscellaneous Correspondence 1916”, General Correspondence Files, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 110, File “Miscellaneous Correspondence 1916”, General Correspondence Files, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

Factory Day

Mining in Ballarat was no longer the main source of employment for the workforce in 1916 and new industries were critical for the survival of the city. In an endeavour to showcase and promote locally manufactured goods, Factory Day was an event organised by Ballarat luminaries and business men in an effort to attract greater enterprise and patronage to the district, thereby providing further opportunities for employment and industry for the community.

VPRS 13009/P1 Unit 49, page 6, Notice Papers and Reports to Council. Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 13009/P1 Unit 49, page 6, Notice Papers and Reports to Council. Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

Women in uniform

For many years Ballarat council had been lobbied by various community groups to employ police women in Ballarat. The council made movements in this direction as seen in this request forwarded to the Town Clerk of the City of Sydney to gather information and guidance from their municipal counterparts. New South Wales and South Australia were the first states to employ women in this role in 1915. Women first made an appearance in the Victorian police force in Melbourne in 1917. It wasn’t until 1949 that Ballarat received an auxiliary police woman and then finally in 1950 the first fully sworn police woman was added to their ranks.

VPRS 8118/P1 Unit 15, page 797, Outward Letter Book, Ballaarat East (Municipal District 1857-1863; Borough 1863-1870; Town 1872-1921)

VPRS 8118/P1 Unit 15, page 797, Outward Letter Book, Ballaarat East (Municipal District 1857-1863; Borough 1863-1870; Town 1872-1921)

It’s a hard life in 1916

Hardship was ever present for many people in 1916 with minimal welfare which was stretched to breaking point. Women and children were particularly affected by poverty and hardship as husbands and fathers left the family home to go to war leaving behind loved ones with little means of support.

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 125, File “Petitions 1913 - 1920”, General Correspondence Files, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 125, File “Petitions 1913 – 1920”, General Correspondence Files, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

 

 

VPRS 8118/P1 Unit 15, page 178, Outward Letter Book, Ballaarat East (Municipal District 1857-1863; Borough 1863-1870; Town 1872-1921)

VPRS 8118/P1 Unit 15, page 178, Outward Letter Book, Ballaarat East (Municipal District 1857-1863; Borough 1863-1870; Town 1872-1921)

 

A plaintive request for assistance

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 111, File “Miscellaneous”, General Correspondence Files, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 111, File “Miscellaneous”, General Correspondence Files, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

 

Times were tough even if you were lucky enough to have a job in 1916. This petition signed by municipal employees of the City of Ballarat for a pay increase of one shilling a day highlights the difficulties of trying to make ends meet. The council was sympathetic to the request and after careful consideration subsequently granted the workers a 6 pence a day pay increase which was gratefully accepted.

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 111, File “Wage Increase”, General Correspondence Files, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 111, File “Wage Increase”, General Correspondence Files, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

Civil disobedience

The average citizen was unable to afford an automobile in 1916, drays, carts and bicycles were still the primary conveyance for goods and people and traffic infringements were still just as common place then as they are now.

VPRS 8118/P1 Unit 15, page 899, Outward Letter Book, Ballaarat East (Municipal District 1857-1863; Borough 1863-1870; Town 1872-1921)

VPRS 8118/P1 Unit 15, page 899, Outward Letter Book, Ballaarat East (Municipal District 1857-1863; Borough 1863-1870; Town 1872-1921)

 

Vandalism and deliberate damage to public property was not uncommon in 1916 and was probably perpertrated, as is a timeless trend, by the disaffected and rebellious youth in an attempt to make their mark in the community.

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 110, File “Progress Association 1916”, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 110, File “Progress Association 1916”, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 110, File “Progress Association 1916”, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 110, File “Progress Association 1916”, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

 

Visitors to Ballarat

Ballarat, well known in many countries throughout the world for its long history of gold mining, continued to draw distinguished visitors to the city in 1916. One such occasion were officers of the Japanese Imperial Navy whose vessels were harboured in Port Phillip Bay while visiting Australia as representatives of Great Britain’s allies during World War I. A very different scenario was to follow in the next few decades during World War II.

VPRS 13009/P1 Unit 48, page 158, Notice Papers and Reports to Council. Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 13009/P1 Unit 48, page 158, Notice Papers and Reports to Council. Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

Empire Day

Empire Day observed by children in state schools since 1905, was never more important than during the war years. Despite the need for economy and frugality, Empire Day was celebrated with patriotic fervor.

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 109, File “Education Department 1916”, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 109, File “Education Department 1916”, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 109, File “Education Department 1916”, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 2500/P0, Unit 109, File “Education Department 1916”, Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

Farewell to the “Ballarat Battalion” and Ballarat in 1916

The 39th Battalion was formed on 21 February 1916 at the Ballarat showgrounds as an expansion of the 1st A.I.F. It was comprised of recruits from Ballarat and many places throughout the western district of Victoria. After rigorous training, both in Australia and overseas, the battalion was sent to the western front where they were to take part in various campaigns resulting in many honours but also many casualties. The unit was ultimately disbanded in 1919 and the remaining personnel gradually returned home.

VPRS 13009/P1 Unit 48, page 150, Notice Papers and Reports to Council. Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

VPRS 13009/P1 Unit 48, page 150, Notice Papers and Reports to Council. Ballaarat (Municipal District 1855-1863; Borough 1863-1870; City 1870-1994)

State archives on display at City Gallery

  • Hand-shaped building, 1978, designed by Michael Hilton, Decatur, Texas, USA

Spaceships on rooftops, a hand-shaped building and an ornamental lake with British Isles-shaped islands are among the unrealised plans for Melbourne that feature in a new City Gallery exhibition.

Featuring records from our ‘Landmark’ collection, ​A History of the Future: Imagining Melbourne includes building plans, underground roads and public art projects proposed by city planners, architects, artists and writers over the last 180 years that would have changed the face of the city and how we engage with it.
 
The exhibition also features a 14-metre long panoramic wall drawing by artist Lewis Brownlie whose imagined Melbourne’s cityscape brings some of these dreams and schemes to life.
 
Chair of the Arts and Culture Portfolio Councillor Rohan Leppert said A History of the Future was a fascinating compilation of some largely forgotten plans for a Melbourne that never was.
 
A History of the Future is a wonderful opportunity to see what might have been and reflect on how we can best protect and preserve Melbourne’s heritage and natural environment,’ Councillor Leppert said.
 
Clare Williamson said the exhibition contains food for thought for anyone interested in Melbourne’s past, present and future. 
 
‘In recent years, Melbourne has been transformed, not by towering landmarks, dramatic demolitions or elevated walkways, but by subtle adjustments to the fine grain of its urban fabric,’ Clare said. 
 
The exhibition is open from 19 May until Friday 12 August 2016. For more information see www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/citygallery

Our current technology issues: an apology and a plan

A message to all of our researchers, agency colleagues and institutional partners

Many of you will be aware that in recent months we have been severely impacted by technology problems that have affected your ability to undertake online research of our collection. There have been periods of slowness, system time-outs and unplanned outages to our collection search tool.

I want to acknowledge to you all that I know this is really frustrating for you. It’s also really frustrating for me, and for my colleagues here at PROV who are absolutely committed to making our unique collection as discoverable and usable as possible. We always foresaw the decline of our current technology over time and have been planning to introduce new technology in time to avoid the issues that we’re now experiencing. Unfortunately the rate of that decline has been faster than we predicted. I want to share with you what we’re doing about this issue.

In the short term we’re focussing on the most acute causes of our online service problems and planning to put in place solutions to last us for the short- to medium-term. The aim is to stabilise our existing online services as much as possible given the technology involved. This will go part of the way to resolving the problems, but there will still be ad hoc slowness and the occasional unplanned outage. We’re aiming to minimise these disruptions.

In the medium term we’re planning for an entirely new online environment. We’re already well under way with our collection systems transformation program and will be launching our new website around the middle of this year. That will improve the navigation of our site tremendously, and will be the first component of our new collection systems environment. We’ll also be progressively introducing more online functionality, with better search facilities and results presentation capabilities.

In the long term we will be replacing all of the core systems that deliver online services to you. We will have a new website supported by a new security environment. We will deliver a sophisticated and elegant search capability that will deliver online content more quickly and reliably. The environment will be more highly available at all times. This is our commitment to you.

In the meantime please continue to keep us informed of any system issues. Your reports assist us to verify that our short-term solutions continue to keep the service running for you all. We will shortly introduce a more streamlined way for you to register all issues that you experience but until then feel free to contact us via our usual channels: Facebook, Twitter and our website.

Thank you.

Graeme Hairsine
Assistant Director, Corporate Services

Why volunteer with us?

IMG_3758 - CopyHere, one of our long-standing volunteers Irene Kearsey lets us in on why she loves volunteering with us here at Public Record Office Victoria (PROV):

Why did you start volunteering at PROV?

During my working life, I’d collaborated with a PROV archivist to develop a retention schedule for public hospitals which got me interested in the archival value of records. Post retirement, volunteering at PROV was inevitable.

What’s the most exciting record you’ve discovered?

One of the Bills of Sale was the then unknown artist Gordon Coutts raising a loan with his art works included in the list of assets. This lead me to research his later life (very racy) and his work (his most famous painting is “Waiting” held by the Art Gallery of NSW).

The most moving record was among the Koori papers: during the First World War, a Coranderrk woman wrote to the government department asking for a rail pass to Melbourne so she could farewell her son who was embarking as a soldier – the letter was endorsed “No funds available.”

What project are you working on now?

Currently Bills of Sale, the indexing of which will make a great resource easily available to family historians.

What do you enjoy most about volunteering?

The content of the work; the company of fellow volunteers and staff; the occupation of time that then can’t be wasted on housework.

If you’d like to join Irene as a volunteer, click here.

May Records Management Network event wrap-up

  • Photo of a microphone
    Records Management Network, May 2016.

Public Record Office Victoria (PROV) hosted the latest installment of the Records Management Network (RMN) on Friday 6th May 2016. The event featured presentations from across Victorian Government and the private sector, focusing on records management innovations and improvements, predominately in the digital sphere.

From the City of Casey, Sally Curtain, Tim Brown and Sheena Frost presented ‘Recordkeeping by Stealth, our Journey to Digital’. It outlined how the largest municipality in Victoria transformed their information management regime from predominately paper-based to a digital environment. With a clear digitisation plan and road map, the City of Casey demonstrated that they have greatly increased the uptake of records managements users in their organisation, as well as the quantity of documents on, and storage volumes within, enterprise content management (ECM). Along the way City of Casey have been able to gradually move closer to the PROV standard for records compliance. A key challenge has been reducing paper usage and related physical storage, while maintaining a customer first, digital first philosophy.

Linda Tolson from Monash Health presented, ‘Migration of Records from Legacy System – Managing the Change’, outlining how the organisation has been able to create better information management efficiencies. As the largest health provider in the state, it manages a vast array of records covering patients, clinical health, and business administration, including significant quantities of contracts and student practitioner records. Recordkeeping issues and challenges were identified, with the aim to have 70% of electronic documents stored in their EDRMS. This involved a TRIM and network drive migration and file mapping; here Monash Health swept out the DIRT – documents which were Duplicates, Irrelevant, Redundant and/or Trivial.

Iron Mountain’s Daniel Warren-Smith presented on ‘Digitisation Trends in the Private Sector’. The company’s three main scanning solutions are pre-process, post-process, and legacy conversion. From here, five ‘lessons’ from digitisation with examples were shared with the audience. One such lesson was ‘The business case is never in the paper’, implying that paper based recordkeeping attracts high storage and access costs, and carries a degree of risk while potentially hindering the desired level of customer service. Another key lesson was ‘Simple solutions are best’. Daniel gave the example of a document conversion that Iron Mountain carried out involving 30,000 files, where the client had an overly onerous document classification in place; this had to be simplified for efficiency. Along with simplicity, another take home message was the advice to look at the process, rather than focusing on the technology to be used.

Lyn Morgan’s presentation (from the Transport Accident Commission (TAC)) ‘Resilience – the key to successfully rolling out a records management project’ highlighted how the TAC audited their information management practices, and overcame barriers to eventually implement an EDRMS. This was facilitated by an appointed project team, which was assigned after a retention and disposal authority (RDA; PROS 14/01) was issued in August 2014, for use by TAC, as well as a BCS being created. Lyn highlighted that it was difficult process, emphasising that good recordkeeping has benefits for the user, but that staff need to understand how the EDRMS will help them in their work. Each TAC workgroup’s records access requirements were sought to be met through the configuration of the EDRMS. Resilience and ‘a bit of mongrel’ were vital ingredients during the implementation process.

Finally, Michelle Tolliday from the Victorian Auditor-General’s Office (VAGO) presented ‘Access to Public Sector Information’, which described the 2009 Economic Development & Infrastructure (EDIC) Parliamentary Inquiry into Improving Access to Victorian Public Sector Information and Data (PSI Inquiry) and the subsequent 2015 VAGO report Access to Public Sector Information. VAGO’s role is to provide assurance to parliament on accountability and performance of the Victorian public sector. The extensive VAGO 2015 recommendations included the development of whole-of-government information management framework; the use of PROV’s IM3 tool; and maintaining the PSI asset register.

Stay tuned for copies of each of the presentations. To sign up for notifications about future RMN events, email standards@prov.vic.gov.au

Bendigo Library Heritage Discovery Week

advertiser_letter_rate_booksThe Bendigo Regional Archives Centre is planning a week of talks, tours and workshops as part of Bendigo Library’s Heritage Discovery Week

The Bendigo Regional Archives Centre is a grassroots historical archives centre, where visitors can view and use original historical records in person.

Take a tour of the archives, discover what secrets lie amongst the local council’s 19th century correspondence or learn what mattered most to Bendigo citizens through a rich archive of petitions. 

 

The Bendigo Regional Archives Centre will also be open on Saturday 14 May from 10-2pm, along with Bendigo Library, for a special Heritage Discovery Day event. There will be research staff on hand to answer questions, volunteers from local genealogical groups and City of Greater Bendigo Heritage staff. 

Bookings are essential.

Learn more about the Bendigo Regional Archives Centre here. 

View the full Bendigo Heritage Week program here.

Hazel Edwards’ 13 tips for historians marketing a memoir

NEW hazeledwardshires4jpegHazel Edwards is coming back to the Victorian Archives Centre this June to teach us all how to write a ‘non-boring’ memoir. Here she’s given us a sneak preview into some of her tips for what to do once your memoir is published. 

13 Tips for Family Historians Marketing a Memoir:

Family historians or ‘genis’ have special challenges. How should they shape their stories? And how can they share them?

A ‘memoir’ is a slice of life, not a whole history. It may be autobiographical (about you) or biographical (about a relative) or it may be a special period or place. But generally your prospective readers will already be interested, because it’s about THEM even if the link is tenuous.

Unless your subject has broad interest, you’ll be self-publishing for a family reader rather than submitting to a  traditional publisher.

The ‘indie’ world of self-publishing is full of memoirs which are shorter versions of autobiographies. What will make yours stand out? Assuming you’ve written it as well as possible, why might the media give your book any attention? Often the ‘indie’ author has to be the publicist too. With only 24 hours in a day, time and energy management matters.

  1. Have a generic description of less than 100 words which you can attach to any media. Could be the BCB (back cover blurb) like this but needs to be written in the style (and tone) of the book.

Not Just a Piece of Cake – Being an Author

Hazel Edwards has a cake-eating hippo on her roof, an OAM for Literature and thousands of book-children, as well as a real family, plus the Hazelnuts she has mentored and a readership in thirteen languages.

Using ‘anecdultery’, Hazel explains why writing, longterm, is mentally risky but vital culturally and contributes to a non-boring life. The hippocampus is where memories are kept, even those of Antarctica, where Hazel was an expeditioner. She shares her author quest and the quandary of how much to reveal. (OAM is not for Hippo as an Outsized, Awesome Myth.)

  1. Put a hi-res magazine quality author photo ( & cover) on your website under Media Resources for easy download. Saves time, looks professional and controls the quality of the visuals. For example: http://www.hazeledwards.com/page/media_resources.html
  1. Have a marketing strategy and tick off which worked and why the others didn’t. Bad timing? Wrong sort of place?

  2. A Media Release is a significant single page used in many ways. Tight, informative writing. No gush. Make sure it is not too hi-res for emailing, especially the cover. Needs information such as ISBN, price, where available, format, tiny bio, blurb and cover with your phone contact details for interviews.
  1. Compile an up-to-date list of your PR contacts and offer each a slightly different angle. What is the local interest?

  2. Don’t overlap. For example, the ABC radio will only interview you once. Which is the most appropriate audience area with the greater impact for your subject matter? Regional? National? Community radio? Drive-time? Middle of the night? With limited print review possibilities, online or radio is faster.

  3. Prepare and aptly label so you can find PR material quickly. E.g. How long ? 400 words? 1000 words?  50 or 100 word bio?   Lo or Hi res photo? Where used before?  Don’t have 10 different ones labelled Final Version.

  4. Drop box is useful especially for hi-res photos or long manuscripts. You can email the link to the file on dropbox which saves you printing out or separately e-mailing the big attachment.

  5. Prepare a sheet of points or one-liners useful for when interviewed. Use humour. Link to title. Tell an anecdote against yourself related to researching the memoir.

  6. Describe what your book is about in one sentence. Use the title. Hint at the conflict. e.g.  Via anecdultery, ‘Not Just a Piece of Cake; Being an Author’ shares the risks of being an author longterm when you also have a family.
  1. Don’t agonise over what you HAVEN’T written about. Save that for the next project.

  2. Expect a 10% return on PR initiatives.

  3. Enjoy the process of sharing the significant ideas you’ve discovered in your research and writing. But use humour and be succinct.

Hazel Edwards OAM has published 200 books in various genres but is best known for the classic picture book series, ‘There’s a Hippopotamus on Our Roof Eating Cake’ touring as a theatrical production ‘Hippo! Hippo! – the Musical’. She runs workshops on ‘Writing a Non Boring Family History’ and ‘Authorpreneurship;The Business of Creativity’.  Her memoir is ‘Not Just a Piece of Cake; Being an Author’ (Brolga). Co-written ‘Hijabi Girl’ is just out. 

 

Citizens build Bendigo in the 1870s

You may think of gravel on roads, kerbs, and the establishment of footpaths as menial tasks and not exciting to research as historical subject matter. However, examining petitions on such issues can take your research far beyond the construction of a simple footbridge. You can map the establishment of a town, question the path of its citizens, and even find you ancestor’s name among the petitioners to learn what they saw as important issues in their community.

The Bendigo Regional Archives Centre’s (BRAC) online petitions from residents between 1870 and 1874 provide fascinating insight into infrastructure concerns of the people and the impacts on local life.

A handwritten petition from the residents of Golden Gully

Petition – Footbridge for Golden Gully 18710900

September 1871

To his Worship the Mayor and Councillors of the City of Sandhurst

Gentlemen,

The undersigned residents of Golden Gully beg to draw your attention to the great want of a crossing for foot passengers between the Royal Oak Hotel on the West and the Eastern Side of the Gully. There is a private track which with a small foot bridge might be available at a small cost. There is no crossing between the road which leads to the Belle Vue Hotel and Mr Murcotts, which is a distance of about a mile, many miners who go to work on night shifts are most seriously inconvenienced by the present state of things. Trusting you will give the subject your earliest attention.

We are Gentlemen
Your obedient Servants

Robt. Balmers, Golden Gully
Michael Devereux, Poor Mans Gully
William Tulip, Golden Gully
Richard Alcock, Irons Reef
Thomas Atkin, Sheeps Reef
Edward Howe, Golden Gully
Charles Mumford, Poor Mans Gully
Robert Leach, Poor Mans Gully
John Lowery, Golden Gully
George Bastow, Golden Gully
William Andrews, Golden Gully
Charles Hunt, Golden Gully
James Tingey, Golden Gully
John McNab, Golden Gully
Job Bye, Golden Gully
John Nicolas, Golden Gully, Manager of Union Jack Co.
King Hoey, Golden Gully
Patrick Hayes, Bridge Street
William Tiplady, Golden Gully
Richard Roots, Golden Gully
George Young, Golden Gully
Abraham Chapman, Golden Gully
Wm. Long, Golden Gully
Robert Nicholls, Golden Gully
George Brown, Golden Gully
Peter Hateen, Golden Gully
John Browell, Golden Gully
James Waite, Golden Gully

Robt. J. Scott, Golden Gully
Edwd. Hickey, Golden Gully
James Jamieson, Golden Gully
Thomas Trahair, Golden Gully
Thomas Carbines, Golden Gully
John Carbines, Golden Gully
Michael Donovan, Golden Gully
Reuben Hare, Golden Gully
Simon Shore, Golden Gully
James Hunter, Golden Gully
Harry Farmer, Golden Gully
T. Young, Golden Gully
W.H. Holland, Golden Gully
Wm. H. Dillon, Golden Gully
W.B. Jackson, Golden Gully
Geo. Wildbone, Golden Gully
Robert Rose, Golden Gully
Thomas Laverick, Golden Gully
Jase Pree, Golden Gully
Isaac Forster, Golden Gully
B Snell, Golden Gully
John Wildbone, Golden Gully
William Jones, Golden Gully
Henry Bell, Golden Gully
E. L. Marks, Golden Gully
Thomas Rickard, Golden Gully
Edwd. Martin, Golden Gully
Samuel Murcott, Golden Gully

 

A handwritten petition rwgarding Harrison Street

Petitions For – reduction in width of Harrison Street 18720914

To the Mayor and Councillors of the City of Sandhurst

We the undersigned ratepayers residing in and about Harrison Street, petition, that the breadth of that Street be altered from one chain and a half to one chain in breadth. We beg to submit, that should you deem it expedient to grant the alteration the public would be benefitted by the additional land that would thereby be utilised for residences on the south side of the street, and that no injury would be done to owners of property nor vested interests interfered with in any way.

George Lawson
Edward Gray
James Rule
John Lomasney
Richard Lobb
 J Rouse
W Stterulye (?)
Frederick Webb
Thomas Doxford
Thomas Grigg
John Bowman
Edward Bolam
Foster Stephenson
George H Patrick
David Glass
George H James
Simon Glanville

Thomas Lamb
Henry Martin
Matthew Wall
Thos. M Busst
James Fouls (?)
Michal Chill
George Phillips
Thomas Tuck
James Davies
John Buchanan
Thomas Duffy
W Teague
William Park
Thomas Devine
Thomas Evans
John Derbridge
A. Tawse

Petition against the previous one

Petition Against – reduction in width of Harrison Street 18720914

To the Worshipful the Mayor and Councilors of the City of Sandhurst

Gentlemen

We are quite surprised to find that their is a movement being made by four residents, of Harrisen

Stt., to try and get the said Stt, reduced in width; Lomasney and Rouse do not live in Harrison Stt, theirfore they have no interest in the same, these four residents knew when they built that the Stt was 99 feet in width, the residents on the north side of said stt having lived their most of them for 9 years and some having spent from one to over two thousand pounds in improvements strongly object to said st being made a lane, and we the undersigned hope, should your Honourable Council be inclined to assist these four, in gaining their wish, that you will give us time to lay our case before the Minister of lands, and we beg to be allowed to draw your attention, that should you accede to or in any way assist in reducing the width of said st, that it will be taken as a precedent, by any that feel inclined to suit their own ends, we feel assured that you will not act unjustly, to the first residents and property owners, neither will your [Hon?] Council destroy the Harmony of the laying off, of the different st and we the undersigned will ever pray

Your obedient servants,

Signed by the residents in Harrisson St proper.

John F. H. Cartwright
Francis M. Cartwright
John Watson
Thomas Watson
John T. Burns
John Burns
Hy. Hubbard
John Hampel
James Liddel
Joseph Hawkins
Wm. Gilbert
Henry Norwood

To discover more petitions related to Infrastructure visit the BRAC website.

BRAC is running a workshop about these petitions in conjunction with the National Trust Heritage Festival in May. For information can be found here.

Find our collection through Trove

trove 2

We’re thrilled to announce that our collection is now searchable through the National Library of Australia’s Trove website.

Trove helps you find and use resources relating to Australia. It brings together content from libraries, museums, archives and other research organisations and includes over 475 million online resources – such as books, images, newspapers, maps, music and documents.

In Trove’s Diaries, Letters, Archives zone you can now find 15,313 of our records by searching for nuc:VPRO.

Once you land on the record you’re interested in, you simply click on the ‘related resource’ link which will take you directly to the record in our collection.

Happy researching!

Updated RDA for Records of the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal

Shredded paperPROV has recently developed a new Retention and Disposal Authority (RDA) to cover records created by the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT).

VCAT began operations on 1 July 1998, amalgamating 15 boards and tribunals to deal with a range of civil and administrative disputes. VCAT members have a broad range of skills and qualifications that enables the tribunal to hear and determine cases of varying complexity and subject matter.

The new RDA, PROS 16/03 Retention and Disposal Authority for Records of the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal completely replaces the PROS 05/03 RDA. It also covers a broader range of record classes and aims to clarify the ambiguity of the record class descriptions and disposal actions that were in PROS 05/03.

The new RDA will not authorise the disposal of records of predecessor bodies to VCAT. However, it may be used as an appraisal guide for the records of the predecessor bodies. There is also scope for future extension of the RDA to include other boards and tribunals in the Victorian jurisdiction post a formal appraisal process.

The purpose of a Retention and Disposal Authority is to identify those records created and maintained by Victorian public offices which are required as State archives and to provide approval for the destruction of records not required after minimum retention periods have been met.

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